How to clean a rabbit?

Cute little feet, wide black eyes, and fluffy coat; Rabbit! Yes, that’s what we hear when we listen or read these words. After all, rabbits are one of the most adorable animals to be kept at home. Coming home after an exhausting day at work, and finding your little bunnies hopping here and there in the lawn, is indeed a delightful sight. But what makes them such a popular household pet these days is its marginal care. Luckily unlike other pets, rabbits are quite convenient to be kept at home and are pretty active creatures. Just give them a carrot, and you’ll see them hopping non-stop!

People having rabbits in their households are often worried and confused regarding the right way to clean their furry pets. Although the internet is loaded with diverse information on this topic, yet most sites are unable to provide a clear and convenient solution to clean one’s rabbit. Therefore, to assist individuals who are already having furry friends or are about to bring one, we have provided a full-fledged guide on how to clean one’s rabbit safely.

Rabbits are experts in grooming themselves, and mostly they don’t require your assistance in this regard. They are tidy and will keep themselves clean by themselves. You can’t even provide your rabbit with a bath unless essential as water since it can lead to hypothermia or shock. So naturally, they are self-sufficient to clean themselves. To clean themselves, they lick their fur and use paws even to reach too tricky areas. Plus, they may even get aid from a fellow rabbit to help them clean.

However, at the time, your bunny will require your extra help, especially when they have dirty cages or running feces. Want to know how to clean a rabbit?

Let’s get started!

Start by cleaning its Cage.

The first and foremost thing that you should do is to clean your rabbit’s Cage. If your rabbit already smells disgusting, then its Cage might smell worse. Your bunny’s urine and feces have a very pungent smell. Before initiating the cleaning, you must dispose of all the beddings and thoroughly wash the Cage with soap and warm water. With that, also avoid anything harsh, such as sweep while cleaning the Cage, as it may later irritate your bunny’s skin. After rinsing the Cage, thoroughly dry the Cage and then add new bedding accordingly.

Pro tip: Try using pellet-shaped beddings as they are absorbent and will eventually reduce the bad odor from your bunny.

Dry Cleaning

The ideal approach to cleansing your rabbit is to try dry baths, especially those with running diarrhea (wet- bottom). This step must be done urgently and with precaution as several insects and parasites, including fleas, can be suspected to lay eggs in the fur. You’d need a washcloth or wipe to remove any signs of impurities from the rabbit’s bottom.

Along with that, you’d also be required to get baby cornstarch powder (non-talc) and apply it on the tummy and tail area of its tummy. Now this powder will quickly absorb the filthy areas, after which you can use a brush or comb to eliminate traces of powder and feces. For better smell, you may also buy a scented powder for your little bunny.

Although this cleaning method would seem gross for a moment but trust me, those furry smiles and licks make it all worth-while!

Clean out the scent glands

No matter how much we adore our little bunny, but all of us do hate its filthy smell. Now, this unpleasant smell comes from the rabbit’s scent glands that are around the anus. With time, excretion gets stuck there, which eventually creates a disgusting aroma. To thoroughly clean, you’d also need to clean these scent glands by cotton buds. Take a cotton bud or swab and dip into warm water, and then clean those scent glands. And yes, your rabbit may grow nervous and tickly during this process, to its best to have a partner or friend with you to control him. In case you are unable to do this, you may even get it done by a vet.

Nail / Claw Trimming

The claws of the rabbit proliferate within 4-6 weeks; therefore, regular claw trims are required. You can easily trim the claws by yourself using a nail clipper, or even take it to a vet. While clipping it yourself, make sure to trim carefully and torchlight from underneath to ensure that you don’t cut the vessel (pinkish)

Eyes

Your bunny’s eye is one of the most attractive characteristics. Therefore they rightly deserved to clean. Luckily, cleaning your rabbit’s eye is relatively simple. You can wipe excess gunk or dirt from your bunny’s eye with a clean cloth. If you sometimes experience strange things like excessive tars and grime, you may consult your vet.

Brushing

Removing excess hair from your bunny is an integral part of its cleaning routine. Rabbits shed their hair several times a year; therefore, every once in a while, you must use a soft brush to get rid of excess hairs. However, this isn’t something you’d regularly require as rabbits are capable of keeping themselves neat and tidy.

Use a Flea Comb

Fleas and Nits are pretty common among rabbits that spend most of their time outdoors. Since these are contagious, your rabbit may have gotten it from any other pet at your place or vicinity. Using a flea comb to remove flea and knits from your furry friend is a natural and proven way to keep your rabbit clean.

The good news is that rabbits usually enjoy brushing, so you wouldn’t face many issues. However, this whole method of removing fleas and Nits by flea comb is pretty time-consuming and tiring, so you may get help from a friend or partner if needed. While using the comb, make sure to cover the full body of your bunny. Also, sanitize the comb by keeping it in boiling water in between the cleanings.

You may be required to comb the rabbit again after a few days to account for new hatchings as well. Eventually, after a few weeks, they will be eliminated.

Wet Bath

Your little bunny is afraid of water; hence giving a water bath won’t be that comfortable. Although not recommended but at times, these water baths become necessary when your rabbits get super dirty. Plus, while giving bat, rabbits must not get completely wet; they may even catch a cold. Besides, make sure to gather all the supplies, including shampoo or soap, in advance to avoid making your bunny uncomfortable for a prolonged period. To give the bath, pour some warm water in a container and then add your bunny’s shampoo into it. You’d be required to prepare two shallow containers with minimal water, and place it in a bathtub or a soft surface. First, place the rabbit in the first shampoo-mixed container and gently massage the hind of your rabbit to remove any traces of poop. Once done with the hair cleaning, quickly rinse your bunny by shifting it to the second water-filled container. Remember, you are not supposed to pour water over the bunny; instead, use your hand to rinse.

Once done with the bath, gently dry your rabbit. You may use a clean towel to absorb water droplets, but make sure to be quick. Apart from the towel, you can also use a hairdryer for more convenient drying. Set the dryer to moderate temperature (avoid both hot/cold), and dry out your bunny. However, beware of moving the dryer constantly, so it doesn’t heat or chills your rabbit’s skin excessively, leading to irritation.

You are also recommended to keep a bathed rabbit indoors for at least a night, as cold night temperatures may increase the chances of hypothermia.

Pro tip: Speak and talk to your rabbit while cleaning him, as it will make him comfortable. Not just that, but by talking while cleaning, you can improve your bond with your fluffy bunny!

Conclusion

Our Bunnies are the ultimate source of happiness in our lives; therefore, they rightly deserved to be pampered. Although following up with carefully cleaning your rabbit may be a bit daunting for most, but trust me, no matter how frustrating it gets, those kisses and fury smiles make it all worth-while!

The key here is to avoid as much water as you can. And, when using it, make sure to dry your bunny properly. We hope our recommendations and tips prove useful to you.

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